Welcome

We are centrally located in Gramercy Park, Chinatown and Flushing, NY to better serve your needs.

Welcome

  • Applying Casting for dislocated/fractured bone

  • Imaging Center in Lower Manhattan

    Our comprehensive imaging center features accredited MRI and CT scanning

  • Our Gramercy Park Area Medical Facility

    Serving the Tri-State Area

  • Flushing Queens Therapy Center

  • Imaging Center in Lower Manhattan

    Our comprehensive imaging center features accredited MRI and CT scanning

Frozen Shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is extremely painful, debilitating condition that is little understood. It is NOT tendonitis, bursitis, torn rotator cuff or arthritis, although all these things can lead to frozen shoulder. The result of frozen shoulder is a severe loss of movement of the shoulder in all directions, and extreme pain in the shoulder joint.

 
Frozen Shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis, is extremely painful, debilitating condition that is little understood. It is NOT tendonitis, bursitis, torn rotator cuff or arthritis, although all these things can lead to frozen shoulder. The result of frozen shoulder is a severe loss of movement of the shoulder in all direction, and extreme pain in the shoulder joint.


The symptoms of frozen shoulder are severe shoulder pain and very decreased range of motion in the shoulder joint. The tightness and pain in the shoulder can make it very difficult, if not impossible to do regular activities like getting dressed/undressed, combing your hair, showering, driving a car, cooking, housework and many other basic things one normally takes for granted.

Doctors will usually try NSAID?s to control pain and inflammation, but these usually have little to no effect. Usually barcotic pain medication (Vicodin, Percocet, Oxycontin) is needed to control pain during the very painful, angry, first stage.

Doctors don?t really know why some people get frozen shoulder, while others don?t, but certain risk factors seem to be prevalent. Some include:

  • Diabetes
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Illness or injury that forces you to keep the shoulder immobile for a period of time
  • Disc problem in your neck
  • Heart and/or lung disease

 

Who gets Frozen Shoulder?

 

  • It affects between 2-5% of population.
  • It is more common in women (60%)
  • It is five times more common in diabetics.
  • It affects mainly 40-60+ year olds.
  • Approximately 15% of people get it on both sides.

 

Current treatment options:

 

  • Physical therapy
  • Occupational therapy
  • Cortisone shots
  • Manipulation under anesthetic
  • Alternative treatment: some patients have reported successful outcomes using alternative treatment such as massage therapy, acupuncture and trigger point massage among others. These have been used either alone or in addition to standard therapies like physical therapy.


The good news is, it?s not fatal and you will recover. The bad news is, it can take a very long time